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Connect: Recovery Capital

Connect: Recovery Capital

Developing your own Recovery Capital

Underpinning all ARC activities is the development of Recovery Capital - the personal, social and community resources that help people move on from their addiction. During the initial stages of recovery, we ask everyone accessing the ARC to meet with a Recovery Worker to explore their own recovery capital; identifying and developing some personal goals and gaining a sense of control.

The aim is for uplifting, positive and supportive conversation. Goals will be specific to you, for example you might not have many interests away from drinking, you may be finding it hard to cope without alcohol or don’t have any non-drinking friends. Accessing our own timetable of ARC activities will support these goals, but we will also encourage you to look outwards at your own support assetts such as family and friends, other services and interests. 

Peer support
Accessing peer support will significantly help you to build Recovery Capital. Users of our recovery community identify social isolation as the most likely factor of a relapse and peer support as the most valued part of the ARC. Our peer activities enable people to build appropriate social relationships, critical to supporting their long-term recovery.

  • Drop-in - a safe, non-judgemental and social space where you’ll meet friendly people in recovery 
  • SMART Recovery Meetings – a science based mutual aid group, supporting you to cope with urges and deal with problems 
  • Peer Mentors and Recovery Coaches - peer support during periods of crisis, hospital stays, treatment or following completion of a rehab programme 
  • Telephone Recovery Check-in – we can offer a weekly telephone call from a peer to keep you on track, especially if you are unable to physically attend 
  • Moodmasters© - CBT-based group programme focussed on building resilience and tackling mental-health problems
  • Family SMART Meeting - mutual aid group for friends, family or loved-ones who may be struggling to cope with someone else's drinking